Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 161 Marketing Sociale

 


Powered by Scoop.it

 

 

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 160

 


Powered by Scoop.it

Despite advances in behavioural science, there is no widely shared understanding of the ‘mechanisms of action’ (MoAs) through which individual behaviour change techniques (BCTs) have their effects. Cumulative progress in the development, evaluation and synthesis of behavioural interventions could be improved by identifying the MoAs through which BCTs are believed to bring about change…….. Conclusions: The BCT-MoA links described by intervention authors and identified in this extensive review present intervention developers and reviewers with a first level of systematically collated evidence. These findings provide a resource for the development of theory-based interventions, and for theoretical understanding of intervention evaluations. The extent to which these links are empirically supported requires systematic investigation.

 

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 159

 


Powered by Scoop.it

In May 2018, the National Institutes of Health
(NIH) began enrollment for a vast medical research
cohort. Named “All of Us,” it’s meant to
include 1 million U.S. volunteers, who will be studied
over 10 years at a cost of $1.45 billion.
The project promises to “lay
the scientific foundation for a new
era of personalized, highly effective
health care,” a counterpoint
to previous “‘one-size-fits-all’ medicine.”
All of Us derives from a decade’s
worth of developments in
the research world. In 2011, the
National Academies of Sciences,
Engineering, and Medicine called
for a “new taxonomy of human
disease,” stating that “opportunities
to define diseases more precisely
and to inform health-care
decisions” were “being missed.”1
Five years later, President Barack
Obama launched the Precision
Medicine Initiative. The concept
was promoted by NIH Director
Francis Collins, who defined it
as “prevention and treatment strategies
that take individual variability
into account.”2 A bandwagon
effect followed, with marked shifts
in resources and attention toward
precision medicine.
This email was sent to *|EMAIL|*

why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences

 

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 158

 


Powered by Scoop.it

























As AI becomes more pervasive in healthcare, can robots learn to show more empathy than doctors?

Except medicine requires more than just technical expertise: It needs empathy, too.

Empathy has been noticeably lacking in medicine as of late. In the past few decades, doctors have developed a reputation for being coldand aloof, for treating patients as numbers and objects, not human beings with valid lived experiences and unique histories. One of the most common complaints among patients today is the “clinical” attitude of their attending physicians. That word has become synonymous with detached, unempathetic, and impersonal treatment—everything many of us would much rather our attending physician not be.




The ECDC Fellowship Programme has the following programme objectives: To strengthen the surveillance and control of infectious diseases and other cross border health threats or  issues of public health concern in the EU/EEA Member States and at EU level, supporting the implementation of Decision 1082/2013/EU; To enhance response capacities for effective field investigation and communicable disease control at national and community level to meet public health threats; To strengthen the European network of public health professionals through use of shared standards and methods,  good practices and common public health objectives; To support cascading of training and capacity building within the Member States; To facilitate multi-disciplinary cooperation in the above fields. It has two paths: a path for field epidemiology and a path for public health microbiology Field epidemiology path (EPIET): This path focuses on training and practical experience in intervention epidemiology at the national and regional centres for surveillance and control of communicable diseases in the European Union. Public health microbiology path (EUPHEM): This path focuses on training and practical experience in laboratories with public health functions or training sites with a consortium of different laboratories in Europe.

































 

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 157

 


Powered by Scoop.it

This email was sent to *|EMAIL|*

unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 156

 


Powered by Scoop.it

Background: The aim of the study is the application of the techniques and tools of social marketing to improve the awareness about HIV transmission and encourage young students between the age of 18 and30 to access at HIV testing given that 85% of new diagnosis in 2016 may be attributed to unprotected sex (Italian National Health Service ISS-2016). The number of young people that take the test is low, making the risk of late presenters much higher; for that reason a survey was addressed to a sample of 200 Alma Mater Studiorum students.
Material and methods: To realize the project’s goal we implemented a “Social Marketing Plan” in order to stimulate changes in the approach to the issue and induce changes in individual behavior; but there are still many barriers facing the achievement of this goal from lack perception of the risk and the stigma that the illness carries with it. To implement the study we planned a partnership with the “Plus Association” given their expertise in the execution of the “fast HIV test “and counselling in the “Blq Checkpoint Center” that was chosen as reference point for the students.The center is easily accessible by our target, guarantee the execution of the “fast HIV test” and counseling in a welcoming environment out of the hospital but in connection with the hospital for the “second level” assessments and treatments. Once the strategy was outlined, the next step was to reach the target, both, online and offline. Social networks were the “pillar” for
online promotion, must of all Facebook and the “testatHiv page” through which we shared “information pills” about prevention in formats easily to absorb. Moreover, the “TestatHiv page” was the promoter of the offline work; this consisted in face to face interviews with students between 19 and 30,who were asked the knew the difference between AIDS and HIV, the ways of transmission and if they had ever taken the test. The goal
of interviews was the highlighting of the poor knowledge about the issue, influence behaviors and stimulatestudents to go to the “BLQ  CheckPoint Center” and get tested. Most of the students interviewed showed a lack of knowledge about the prevention issue; the 73.3% of the students had never taken the test.
Results and Conclusions: Thanks to our initiative and the overtime opening of the “BLQ Checkpoint Center“to make easier access during the “European Testing Week”, 61 students under the age of 30 went to the “BLQ Checkpoint Center” to take the HIV test (29 heterosexuals and 32 homosexuals). The great increment
of accesses that went much further the “European Testing Week” showed that this Social Marketing Strategy is successful and can produce positive cognitive and behavioral changes in this specific target group.
A recent Fortune article on big data in healthcare quoted Dr. Brennan Spiegel, a physician-scientist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center as saying, “Digital health is not a computer science or an engineering science; it’s a social science and a behavioral science,” in the context of a discussion on the hype-evidence gap in digital health. He tweeted the same line back in August, eliciting hundreds of retweets and shares.
Spiegel has cited his own failure experience from attempting to build health technology whilst not addressing behavioral factors like patient motivation, engagement, and long-term adherence. He has elaborated, “Creating the tech isn’t the hard part. The hard part is using the tech to change patient behavior.“ As behavioral scientists, we are encouraged to see increasing value placed on behavioral science in a space that has generally been a slow adopter of it—after all, chief behavioral officers in digital health companies are still unicorns.
Come per Uber nel campo dei taxi, le innovazioni Uber-like in sanità mettono a nudo l’incapacità e il ritardo del sistema – e soprattutto dei professionisti – nel venire incontro alle legittime esigenze degli utenti. Perché è così difficile contattare il proprio medico telefonicamente? Perché non è possibile comunicare con lui via email o via skype? Perché fare una coda e perdere mezza giornata per la banale ripetizione di una ricetta? Organizzazioni più attente all’innovazione – guarda caso diffuse proprio nei pressi della Silicon Valley, cioè in California – come Kaiser Permanente da anni hanno introdotto modalità di rapporto tra medici e pazienti più dirette e più comode, basate sull’uso delle tecnologie e di internet4. …Ma la medaglia di queste innovazioni ha l’altra faccia, assai meno amichevole e rassicurante. Quella della polverizzazione dell’offerta sanitaria in un caotico mercato sanitario, dove il basso prezzo delle prestazioni ha come corrispettivo il basso salario, talora lo sfruttamento, dei professionisti, dove overdiagnosis e overtreatment sono quasi sempre la regola, dove la qualità non è quasi mai controllata, dove si possono facilmente annidare frodi e abusi. 
3.3. Sprechi e inefficienze Dopo i riferimenti culturali che hanno caratterizzato la sanità degli scorsi decenni (efficacia negli anni ’70-’80, EBM e costo-efficacia negli anni ’90, qualità e sicurezza negli anni 2000), oggi la crisi di sostenibilità dei sistemi sanitari, in particolare quelli a finanziamento prevalentemente pubblico, impone di riconoscere nel value il driver della sanità del XXI secolo. Il value, definito da Michael Porter come il «ritorno in termini di salute delle risorse investite in sanità», risulta dal rapporto tra outcome di salute rilevanti per il paziente (esiti favorevoli – effetti avversi) e costi sostenuti e può essere stimato a vari livelli: intero percorso assistenziale, singolo intervento sanitario, tempo/uomo, etc.
“Le nostre stime indicano  che il 19% della spesa pubblica e il 45% di quella privata non producono alcun ritorno in termini di salute” Nino Cartabellotta – Italia oggi
Digital therapeutics are a new category of apps that help treat diseases by modifying patient
behavior and providing remote monitoring to
improve long-term health outcomes. These apps
can help hypertension patients lower their blood
pressure, reduce dependence on opioids for those
with chronic pain, and help diabetics monitor their
blood sugar.
“For blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, obesity
– lifestyle-related chronic illnesses – the foundation
of good care is behavioral change,” says dermatologist
Dr. Joseph Kvedar, vice president of connected
health at Partners HealthCare in Boston and a
board member of the Personal Connected Health
Alliance. Digital therapeutics is an especially powerful
tool when it sends personalized messages that
motivate people to make healthier choices, he adds.
The digital therapeutics market is forecast to
grow from $1.7 billion in 2016 to $9.4 billion by
2025, according to Grand View Research Inc. The
increase is driven by improving technology and
data algorithms, the openness of patients using and
wearing technology, and research showing the
e. ectiveness of technology in improving health.
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list
*

 

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 155

 


Powered by Scoop.it

The story so far

Since September 2016, TIME has been following three Syrian refugees as they prepared to give birth and raise a child in a foreign land. All of the women learned of their pregnancies on the road and none expected to deliver in a refugee camp, far from the homes they fled in Syria. These women are among the more than 1,000 refugees who gave birth in Greek refugee camps in 2016 alone. As babies, born of no nation, take their first steps, they face an uncertain future. Their parents continue their search for a home in a world that is increasingly hostile to refugees.
Follow us as the story unfolds daily on Instagram, watchHeln’s First Yearand see the journey mapped across the globe on Google Earth. Click here to find out how you can help.
This daily struggle plays out against the backdrop of Europe’s newest experiment to integrate hundreds of thousands of refugees, some into countries that have very little experience with outsiders. With our year-long multimedia project, “Finding Home,” TIME brings you their stories.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY LYNSEY ADDARIO | REPORTING BY ARYN BAKER | VIDEO BY FRANCESCA TRIANNI

Case Study: Always #LikeAGirlAlways needed a way to appeal to a next generation of consumers in the face of growing competition from rivals that were gaining traction with Millennial girls via social media. The award-winning response was the Always #LikeAGirl campaign, that turned a phrase that had become an insult into an empowering message.
Together Leo Burnett Chicago, Holler and Always scooped up a Black Pencil 2015 Award for their #LikeAGirl campaign. The BriefAlways’ commitment to empowering girls through puberty education dates back decades. Yet in 2013, P&G realised the brand’s purpose wasn’t apparent to the new generation of consumers. Always’ brand communications had remained focused on product performance, while its main rivals had moved on. The challenge was to build a fresh and more meaningful understanding of confidence which would resonate with the next generation of consumers….
This email was sent to *|EMAIL|*

why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences