Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 162 Marketing Sociale

 


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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 161 Marketing Sociale

 


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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 160

 


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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 159

 


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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 158

 


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As AI becomes more pervasive in healthcare, can robots learn to show more empathy than doctors?

Except medicine requires more than just technical expertise: It needs empathy, too.

Empathy has been noticeably lacking in medicine as of late. In the past few decades, doctors have developed a reputation for being coldand aloof, for treating patients as numbers and objects, not human beings with valid lived experiences and unique histories. One of the most common complaints among patients today is the “clinical” attitude of their attending physicians. That word has become synonymous with detached, unempathetic, and impersonal treatment—everything many of us would much rather our attending physician not be.





































 

 

Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 157

 


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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 156

 


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Background: The aim of the study is the application of the techniques and tools of social marketing to improve the awareness about HIV transmission and encourage young students between the age of 18 and30 to access at HIV testing given that 85% of new diagnosis in 2016 may be attributed to unprotected sex (Italian National Health Service ISS-2016). The number of young people that take the test is low, making the risk of late presenters much higher; for that reason a survey was addressed to a sample of 200 Alma Mater Studiorum students.
Material and methods: To realize the project’s goal we implemented a “Social Marketing Plan” in order to stimulate changes in the approach to the issue and induce changes in individual behavior; but there are still many barriers facing the achievement of this goal from lack perception of the risk and the stigma that the illness carries with it. To implement the study we planned a partnership with the “Plus Association” given their expertise in the execution of the “fast HIV test “and counselling in the “Blq Checkpoint Center” that was chosen as reference point for the students.The center is easily accessible by our target, guarantee the execution of the “fast HIV test” and counseling in a welcoming environment out of the hospital but in connection with the hospital for the “second level” assessments and treatments. Once the strategy was outlined, the next step was to reach the target, both, online and offline. Social networks were the “pillar” for
online promotion, must of all Facebook and the “testatHiv page” through which we shared “information pills” about prevention in formats easily to absorb. Moreover, the “TestatHiv page” was the promoter of the offline work; this consisted in face to face interviews with students between 19 and 30,who were asked the knew the difference between AIDS and HIV, the ways of transmission and if they had ever taken the test. The goal
of interviews was the highlighting of the poor knowledge about the issue, influence behaviors and stimulatestudents to go to the “BLQ  CheckPoint Center” and get tested. Most of the students interviewed showed a lack of knowledge about the prevention issue; the 73.3% of the students had never taken the test.
Results and Conclusions: Thanks to our initiative and the overtime opening of the “BLQ Checkpoint Center“to make easier access during the “European Testing Week”, 61 students under the age of 30 went to the “BLQ Checkpoint Center” to take the HIV test (29 heterosexuals and 32 homosexuals). The great increment
of accesses that went much further the “European Testing Week” showed that this Social Marketing Strategy is successful and can produce positive cognitive and behavioral changes in this specific target group.
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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 155

 


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The story so far

Since September 2016, TIME has been following three Syrian refugees as they prepared to give birth and raise a child in a foreign land. All of the women learned of their pregnancies on the road and none expected to deliver in a refugee camp, far from the homes they fled in Syria. These women are among the more than 1,000 refugees who gave birth in Greek refugee camps in 2016 alone. As babies, born of no nation, take their first steps, they face an uncertain future. Their parents continue their search for a home in a world that is increasingly hostile to refugees.
Follow us as the story unfolds daily on Instagram, watchHeln’s First Yearand see the journey mapped across the globe on Google Earth. Click here to find out how you can help.
This daily struggle plays out against the backdrop of Europe’s newest experiment to integrate hundreds of thousands of refugees, some into countries that have very little experience with outsiders. With our year-long multimedia project, “Finding Home,” TIME brings you their stories.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY LYNSEY ADDARIO | REPORTING BY ARYN BAKER | VIDEO BY FRANCESCA TRIANNI

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Italian Social Marketing Network Newsletter 154

 


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Overall, consumers cite three key things that could improve the doctor-patient relationship: greater connectivity, better convenience via text and online tools, and more time with the doctor. Brands and marketers alike have many things to consider in today’s ever-changing healthcare landscape. Are patients happy with their relationships with their healthcare providers? How likely are they to switch doctors? What could be improved with the doctor-patient experience? How do people want to be communicated with by their providers’ offices?
Millennials
Among the three generations, Millennials are the least satisfied with their doctors and are most likely to switch practices. Not surprisingly, the researchers found that they are also the generation that is most likely to want to receive e-mail and text communication from offices.
Generation X
Many Generation Xers control healthcare decisions across multiple generations, and their preferences and satisfaction levels both fall somewhere between younger and older consumers. Overall, the researchers found that they are fairly similar to Millennials, with an openness to digital communication and to switching providers.
Baby Boomers
Baby Boomers, the biggest consumers of healthcare services, are the least likely to switch doctors. However that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re happy: less than half are satisfied with their current providers. Boomers are also the generation least interested in receiving communications from doctors’ offices digitally.







































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Italian Social Marketing Network – Newsletter 153

 


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